Mum reveals amazing ways to save hundreds of pounds on your second child

As any parent will testify, having a baby doesn’t come cheap.

Findings have revealed that new parents can expect to spend more than £500 in the first weeks of their baby’s life.

This is according to research by discount site, Myvouchercodes , which suggests you could end up spending £23.52 on nappies, £243 on clothing, £53.31 on feeding equipment and £183.51 on things like toys and furniture.

Speak to many parents, and they will tell you they spent a whole lot more than this on their little one in the early days.

As if this weren’t frightening enough, separate figures from the Child Poverty Action Group (CPAG) reveal the overall cost for a couple raising a first child until they are 18 (including rent and childcare) currently stands at a whopping £150,753.

As a mother of a little girl – who is just about to turn three – I know all-too-well just how much the bank balance takes a battering when a bundle of joy comes along.

But what then happens if, like me, you find out you’re expecting number two?

While the mere thought of another body to clothe may fill you with dread, it’s not all bad news, as you already own a mountain of baby clothes and kit – plus you are so much wiser about the stuff you actually need, you won’t spend unnecessarily this time around.

Here we take a look at how to be a second-time parent without spending more than you need to.

Learn from your mistakes

One of the key tips is to avoid getting carried away buying toys and clothes for number two.

As you’ve already had one baby, you probably have a mountain of stuff from the first time around (assuming you didn’t get rid of the whole lot on one of those tough days when you swore you’d never have any more children).

Get the boxes out of the loft or the basement, and take stock of what you’ve got already.

You’ve probably got a pile of clothes – many of which have hardly been worn – as babies grow out of things so quickly. And while it’s not ideal dressing a baby boy from head to toe in pink, you’ve probably got plenty of gender-neutral outfits (and you can always dress him in pink when he’s at home and nobody’s looking).

Recycling clothing and toys between siblings is a great way to save money – and also helps teach children how to share.

Once you’ve done this, dust down your pram, cot, baby car seat and other equipment, and ask yourself whether there are any major gaps in the kit, toys and clothes you already have.

One of the key tips is to avoid getting carried away buying toys and clothes for number two.

As you’ve already had one baby, you probably have a mountain of stuff from the first time around (assuming you didn’t get rid of the whole lot on one of those tough days when you swore you’d never have any more children).

Get the boxes out of the loft or the basement, and take stock of what you’ve got already.

You’ve probably got a pile of clothes – many of which have hardly been worn – as babies grow out of things so quickly. And while it’s not ideal dressing a baby boy from head to toe in pink, you’ve probably got plenty of gender-neutral outfits (and you can always dress him in pink when he’s at home and nobody’s looking).

Recycling clothing and toys between siblings is a great way to save money – and also helps teach children how to share.

Once you’ve done this, dust down your pram, cot, baby car seat and other equipment, and ask yourself whether there are any major gaps in the kit, toys and clothes you already have.

Beg, borrow and buy second hand

If there are things you need, don’t even contemplate buying them new until you’ve asked friends and family for any hand-me-downs and scoured the local charity shops.

With our first baby, generous friends passed on a huge haul of items to us, including a Moses basket, a Baby Bjorn sling, travel cot, baby bouncer, baby bath, toys, and huge bags of clothes.

All of these items would have set us back a fair amount if we’d bought them new.

Other friends lent us a bedside crib and sleep pod known as a “sleepy head” (which we returned to them once our little girl had grown out of them) – and we are lucky enough to be able to borrow these things again second time around.

Since the birth of our little girl, we’ve also made extremely good use of the “FARA Kids” charity shops close to us – and picked up all sorts of things for a fraction of the price, including toys, clothes and a nappy bin and liners.

As well as local charity shops, also check out eBay , Gumtree and Preloved . If you’ve got a girl and are now having a boy, type in the term “bundle of baby boy clothes” (or vice versa if you’re having a girl this time around), and you should come up trumps with piles of goods for sale at rock-bottom prices.

Don’t forget sites such as Freecycle and Freegle, and keep an eye on their local offers of baby freebies.

If you’re not already signed up to the websites of local mum’s groups or parenting communities, now is the time to do so.

Sites are usually teeming with “for sale” items being offered by other parents looking to shift clothes and kit they no longer need.

We got our John Lewis cot second hand for just £45 from the “buy and sell” section of one of these websites (about half the price of a new cot from store), and our Bugaboo pram for about £300 (new models with all the add-ons can cost north of £1,000). Our pram may not be the latest model of Bugaboo, but it had only had one careful owner – and we will definitely use it again for number two (along with a hand-me-down buggy board for our little girl which someone has already given us).

Also check out nearly-new sales run by local branches of the NCT , and pay a visit to local car boot sales.

Be clever about how and where you spend

If you do need to buy odd items – such as muslins and hooded bath towels – check out your local TK Maxx . You’ll find items at heavily discounted prices.

Also check out the baby section of Poundland and other discount stores.

Keep your eyes open, and take advantage of “buy one get one half price” deals and similar offers at Mothercare and other stores.

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